Greek Language Lesson

Courses, resources and discussion on Greek language.
If you know of a good link or course please post it.
Eric & Shirley
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:16 pm

Greek Language Lesson

Postby Eric & Shirley » Sat Jun 30, 2012 4:28 pm

Are there any Greek lessons in the Chania area that anyone can recommend? We've tried using a teaching CD but not getting very far... But can now order a beer!!! :lol:

peebee
Posts: 640
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2011 5:07 am
Location: Kalyves

Postby peebee » Sat Jun 30, 2012 4:40 pm

Only one ? :lol:

Yin&Yang
Posts: 198
Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 6:03 pm
Location: Megala Horafia/Aptera

Postby Yin&Yang » Sat Jun 30, 2012 4:41 pm

Sue at Cretan Corner in Aptera does lessons. She has been living in Athens/Crete for the last thirty years and is married to a Cretan. Lovely lady. I think that she only does lessons during the off season as she runs the family taverna in the summer months.

Although expensive, I find Rossetta Stone excellent for learning the language.
Someday is now : )

Kilkis
Posts: 8772
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Postby Kilkis » Sat Jun 30, 2012 4:42 pm

All you really need is hello, goodbye, yes, no, please, thank you, the word for beer and how to count up to ten. Since you already know the word for beer and hello/goodbye are the same you're almost halfway there.

Warwick

Retired in Crete

Postby Retired in Crete » Sat Jun 30, 2012 6:28 pm

You can get 50 hours of Greek lessons free. These are paid for by the EU.

They usually start around September in one of the local schools. I had mine in Agios Nikolaos but there must be others on this site who can advise where they are held in your area.

Hope this helps

John

Eric & Shirley
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:16 pm

Postby Eric & Shirley » Sat Jun 30, 2012 6:30 pm

WOW and we thought it was a hard language - it turns out we're almost fluent!!! :lol:

Eric & Shirley
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:16 pm

Postby Eric & Shirley » Sat Jun 30, 2012 6:34 pm

Thanks John that is really good news.
Sorry if the WOW reply above seemed weird but we were replying to Warick :lol: [/quote]

Ela
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2012 12:15 am
Location: US West Coast

Postby Ela » Mon Jul 02, 2012 1:31 am

I highly recommend livemocha.com A free interactive and practical language learning website, which is totally member driven. All your exercises can be assessed by a native speaker. I got fairly proficient in Greek that way!

SatCure
Posts: 1890
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:57 pm
Location: Apokoronas

Postby SatCure » Mon Jul 02, 2012 12:59 pm

Beware that the Cretan dialect is very different from that of Cyprus (and varies from village to village).

Here's some random vocab:

Dust cap on a tyre air valve: ena kapáki.
Screw top on a bottle: ena kapáki.
Screw top on a water- or oil-tank: ena kapáki.
Lid on a wood-burning stove: ena kapáki.

Garden hose: ena lastikó.
Car tyre: ena lastikó.
Windscreen wiper rubber: ena lastikó.
Windcsreen washer pipe: ena lastikó.
Radiator hose: ena lastikó.

Tablecloth clip: ena piastráki.
Screwless electrical connector: ena klip.

A large beer in a bottle: mia biera megalo sto boukali.
A small draft beer: mia biera mikri apó to varéli.
(Replace "biera" with name of beer. E.g. "mythos".)

I am full up: fouskossa
I am hungry: eima peinasmenos (peinasmeni if you are female).
It was quite sufficient: itan árketa.

;)

Kilkis
Posts: 8772
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Postby Kilkis » Mon Jul 02, 2012 4:15 pm

You missed out "Amesos" which means three weeks on Thursday.

Warwick

Eric & Shirley
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:16 pm

Postby Eric & Shirley » Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:21 pm

Mmmmmm ..... we're not so fluent after all! :?

We'll definitely get interactive on the net!!!

Thank you

Kilkis
Posts: 8772
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Postby Kilkis » Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:58 pm

Don't worry about it. Even some of Satcure's examples are misleading, partly because he has used the Latin alphabet. For example all his "ena lastikό" in the Greek alphabet are actually ενα λάστιχο. Note that it uses the Greek letter chi (χ) not kappa (k) and that the stress is on the alpha (ά) not on the omicron (ό). Literally it means "rubber" and by inference a load of things made from rubber. Learn the Greek alphabet and think in it whenever you are doing anything Greek. Forget the Latin alphabet when doing Greek.

Also it is very important to learn every noun with the definite article, i.e. "the", in front of it, not the indefinite article, i.e "a", as used by Satcure. This is the single most important lesson to learn before everything else. Make it an absolute habit! Greek grammar is very strict on the gender of nouns. Everything has a gender even though there is no logical reason for it. That gender then defines what happens to the ending of the noun in different grammatical scenarios and the ending of any adjectives associated with it. To make matters worse the word for "the" changes with the gender of the noun, whether it is singular or plural and what purpose the noun has in the sentence. I guarantee that you will find it difficult to remember the gender of every noun that you learn BUT if you always associate that noun with a particular variant of "the" it will help you no end when you come to learn the grammar. Learn the three variants for "the" in the singular, nominative case, i.e masculine feminine and neuter before you learn anything. Get them embedded so deeply in your brain they become second nature. Recite them everywhere you go. Then every noun you learn say it with the correct variant of "the" in front of it depending on the gender of the noun. The dictionary will tell you which gender it is.

At this moment you probably hate me. Three years from now you will thank me. I am very very serious! I wish someone had told me this fifteen years ago.

Warwick

SatCure
Posts: 1890
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:57 pm
Location: Apokoronas

Postby SatCure » Wed Jul 04, 2012 8:38 pm

Lipamai. Ta 'linika mou eina skata! 8)

I'm afraid that I'm still nowhere near fluent. I make frequent mistakes in pronunciation and stress. However, I can give you a tip; a method I use to remember words.

Take something like the word for "the fountain".
Το συντριβάνι

Pronounced "Toh seentreevanee" with the stress on the "van".

In my head I make up a picture of a sentry (in full dress uniform) looking at a van, with a large "E" painted on it, parked in a fountain.

So "seentree van ee" becomes "sentry van E" in picture form.

The word for "the nose" is "η μύτη" - "ee meaty". Just think of a bulbous, meaty nose and you've got it!

In a similar vein, the word "unfortunately" is δυστυχώς pronounced "thisteehoss". It sounds a bit like "fisticuffs" so my association is simply: "unfortunately, it's got to be fisticuffs".

I don't promise this will work for everyone but it's worth trying.

Of course many English words evolved from the Greek so an association already exists. For example, the word for paint or colour is "Chroma", which should be easy to remember.

Similarly "cold" is "Kreeo", which is where we get "cryogenic" from.

Some words and phrases are virtually impossible to remember by means of mental pictures so you just have to damn well learn them; practise saying them, over and over, till you get used to the sound.

"I am full up" is "είμαι φουσκωμένος" pronounced "eemeh fooskomenos" (for a man) or "eemeh fooskomenee" (for a female). It really means "I am bloated" so it's emphasising that you don't have room even for "a wafer thin mint"! But it is still reasonably polite.

If you are tempted to say "eemeh yematos", (I am stuffed), please don't, because it's a crude way to say "I am pregnant". Some might laugh but some might think you are simply being offensive.

If you want to be ultra-polite you can say "το φαγητό ήταν αρκετό", toh fageeto eetan arketo, meaning "the food was enough" (or we would say "quite sufficient").

On the matter of politeness, it is generally accepted that you thank the waiter/owner profusely at the end of the meal, and not before. Do not say "efharisto" every time the waiter brings something to the table because that obliges him to say "parakalo" and he will quickly tire of this game, although he'll be too polite to show it. A smile and a nod is all that is required whenever food or drink is brought.

Oh, an exception: if he says "to your health" (steen ee ya sas) then do thank him!

Final comment: Notice how most locals roll their Rs when speaking and say "eet" instead of "it". It's more noticeable when they speak English. Copy what you hear. Practise speaking English with a Greek accent. Eet weel eemprove your Greek!

(Feel free to correct me if you think I made a mistake. I'm still learning!)

Martin

filippos
Posts: 5305
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Postby filippos » Wed Jul 04, 2012 10:09 pm

SatCure wrote:(Feel free to correct me if you think I made a mistake. I'm still learning!)
It would take too long ........... (and I'm still learning).


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