smart phone app dictionary

Got networking / internet / computer/ TV/ Telephone problems in Crete? Ask here.
johnincrete
Posts: 782
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:04 pm
Location: Chania

smart phone app dictionary

Postby johnincrete » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:49 am

I think a phone is something to make phone calls on but the modern smart phone seems to be a small computer and so far I have resisted getting one. However, I have seen people with all sorts of useful applications and the thing that would pursuade me to get a smart phone is if I could download a Greek/English dictionary.
Does anyone know of such an "app"

filippos
Posts: 5334
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby filippos » Wed Aug 31, 2016 8:17 am

A few for Android phones

Kilkis
Posts: 8836
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby Kilkis » Wed Aug 31, 2016 9:26 am

I've got the Bit Knights free one that is on the page that Filippos linked. It looks like a blue square with the words GRE written above ENG above the word FREE. It's OK but not wonderful.

One of the apps on the same page is Google Translate that works like Google Translate on a PC, i.e. you can put in lots of text not just a single word. I've not tried it but I think you can photograph text, e.g. a sign on a building, and translate it.

As a dictionary I quite like the Magenta version for English speakers That link is to the Windows version that costs €19. There is an Android version that costs €9 but the description of it is all in Greek. The advantage of this particular dictionary is that it gives an English definition of the Greek word often with examples of its use. For example if you put in the English word "right" it will give you all the different Greek words for right, which has many different meanings depending on context, and explain in English what each one means so that you can select the correct one. The free one I mentioned above will give you different Greek words but doesn't give you any idea how each one is used.

I would suggest getting a smart phone with a large screen. Less convenient as a phone but much easier to use as a mobile computer, especially with ageing eyes. I have a small one but I also have a tablet so I rarely use the phone as a computer. Whenever I do I hate it.

Warwick

Jean
Posts: 905
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 7:39 pm
Location: West Crete
Contact:

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby Jean » Wed Aug 31, 2016 11:09 am

I use this one: https://play.google.com/store/apps/deta ... lins.greek
It was recommended by a friend who is a linguist and reckoned that it was the best Greek -English app he'd seen. I've been pretty satisfied with it.

johnincrete
Posts: 782
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:04 pm
Location: Chania

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby johnincrete » Thu Sep 01, 2016 8:20 am

Thanks everyone - obviously what I want is available so now I have to decide which smart phone to buy.

People have mentioned "Android". please excuse my ignorance but I assume Android is like an operating system and so applications for Android would not work on another system - and what is the alternative to Android?

Incidentally, I would not want to take photographs as so many people do - and then bore people by displaying them rather like the bores of old with slide and projector! However, do all smart phones allow you to download photos to a PC (for edit/printing etc)? The phone I have takes photos but only allows them to upload to Facebook.

I have so many questions about smart phones. Is there any web site I can access to get info?

peebee
Posts: 646
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2011 5:07 am
Location: Kalyves

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby peebee » Thu Sep 01, 2016 10:30 am

johnincrete wrote:I assume Android is like an operating system and so applications for Android would not work on another system - and what is the alternative to Android?

Android is the most common OS for smartphones, followed by Apple (i-phones) and then I believe it is Blackberry.
I have a Samsung Android phone (dual SIM) which I am happy with, (bought it on Amazon UK and was delivered here), i-phones are quite a bit more expensive and are overrated IMO.
I advise that you go for one with a decent amount of storage on board, as some apps can be quite hungry for space.
Usually there will be a micro SD slot, for extra storage of photos, videos or applications.
The USB charging lead with mine, also doubles for connecting to my PC to transfer data or photos.
There should be plenty of info out there, just try Googling `Android phone review' or similar.

Kilkis
Posts: 8836
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby Kilkis » Thu Sep 01, 2016 10:48 am

There are basically three smart phone operating systems: IOS, which is exclusive to Apple iPhones, Android, which is used by most other manufacturers, and Windows, which is only on a few.

IOS ties you into Apple but is very good if you don't mind that. iPhones tend to be a bit more expensive than an equivalent Android phone. Another "advantage" of IOS is that every time Apple issue a new version your phone tends to automatically update to it. Many Android phone stay at whatever revision was installed at purchase or sometimes are sold with a one-off upgrade to the next version that gets issued. iPhones also tend to have a bit of a bad reputation for battery life.

You have less choice with IOS. If you take the latest iPhone 6S as an example you can get versions with different amounts of storage varying from about €800 to €1,000 without contract from Vodafone in Greece. They also have 4 earlier models available from about €350 to almost €700. If you then look at Android there are 37 models available from about €60 up to almost €800.

Some Android phones are available in dual SIM versions so you can have a Greek SIM and a UK SIM if that is any use to you. I find it quite useful. They seem to be quite hard to find in Greece but I have bought from Mobicity in the UK by mail order with no problems.

Some Android phones allow you install extra storage. It is usually cheaper to buy such a phone with small storage and then buy a memory card to extend it rather than buying the model with the bigger memory to start with. For example a phone with 128 GB of storage memory might cost €200 more than the same model with 16 GB but you can buy a top quality 128 GB micro SDXC card for less than €50.

Dual SIM and phones with a memory card slot often have an easily removable back so it is also simple to change the battery. You can often get a separate charger and carry a spare fully charged battery with you to give you double the battery life if you are going to be using it a lot away from a charging point.

Transferring photos shouldn't be a problem but check on a model you are interested in before buying it. Android isn't a completely uniform operating system. Many manufacturers customise it so what features are available can vary. Some phones are very close to the original Android OS while others are heavily customised. Samsung for example has a free Windows program called Kies that interacts with the phone when it is connected to the PC with a USB cable and allows you to transfer stuff in both directions and synchronise things like diaries and contact lists between devices. Some phones will simply appear as an external disk drive when connected to a PC so you can use Windows explorer to move files across.

If you find a model you fancy you might find a review of it on Expert Reviews or you could read reviews on there first to decide which models to consider.

I quoted SIM free non-contract prices above. Phones are usually cheaper if you buy them on a contract or as a pay as you go deal but beware, often they are then locked to that provider. Also make sure you negotiate a new contract as soon as the original one expires. Obviously that contract is inflated so they recoup whatever they subsidised the phone for. If you keep paying at that price you are paying well over the odds. Finally choosing a previous model from the latest one will be cheaper.

Warwick

Jean
Posts: 905
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 7:39 pm
Location: West Crete
Contact:

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby Jean » Thu Sep 01, 2016 2:49 pm

If you decide to buy in Greece you'll probably save a lot of money not buying from Cosmote and Vodafone. Once you know what you want search https://www.skroutz.gr for the best deals. The mobile phone market in Greece is highly competitive so you can get pretty good deals

Kilkis
Posts: 8836
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby Kilkis » Thu Sep 01, 2016 5:04 pm

I agree with Jean. I only used Vodafone prices to highlight how costs vary for different systems. I wasn't suggesting buying from them unless you want it subsidised on a contract.

Assuming you are buying SIM free, I would also search UK prices. It's always a difficult decision whether to buy local or buy outside Greece. One thing to consider is what happens if it is faulty. Returning a smart phone to the UK is not expensive. Returning a washing machine or a fridge freezer is a different matter. For most items I buy local. For small items I check out UK prices and buy from the UK if there is a big price difference. I bought my smart phone from the UK because, at the time, dual SIM versions seemed to be uncommon in Greece although there a lot more now. Today you could get a 32 GB Samsung S6 dual SIM, i.e. a top of the range model but not the latest version, for €375 from Mobicity in the UK while Scrooge shows the cheapest price as €525, a difference of €150. Quite a saving. Obviously the lower the price the less the differential.

Incidentally buying the previous model, e.g. Galaxy S6 not Galaxy S7, also saves quite a bit of money and usually there isn't a big difference in the specification.

Warwick

filippos
Posts: 5334
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby filippos » Thu Sep 01, 2016 9:32 pm

"Android" is indeed an operating system and is used in just about all smartphones except Apple iPhones and Microsoft smartphones which use Windows 10.

I don't know if there's a specific web site for answers to questions about smartphones generally but usually a query on Google will provide links to sites with answers to specific questions. E.g. "Can photos on a Samsung XYZ123 be downloaded to my PC" or "How can I download photos from etc." Just formulate your question about whatever is puzzling you and try it. You may end up on a user forum or the phone manufacturer's site or any number of others.

Kilkis
Posts: 8836
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby Kilkis » Thu Sep 01, 2016 10:42 pm

Where's the fun in that, Filippos? I bet you're the sort of person that if you are ill you go and ask a doctor rather than your next door neighbour or the woman who runs the café?

Warwick

filippos
Posts: 5334
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby filippos » Fri Sep 02, 2016 12:01 am

I usually drive myself nuts by trying to work things out by trial and error. If that doesn't work I try Google and if all else fails I follow my son's three letter acronym - RTFM (the F is silent in respectable company). If that fails too I'll ask the woman in the café.

Kilkis
Posts: 8836
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby Kilkis » Fri Sep 02, 2016 6:29 am

What! You RTFM before you ask the woman in the café? You do realise that makes you weird?

Warwick

filippos
Posts: 5334
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby filippos » Fri Sep 02, 2016 7:56 am

You already knew I'm weird but, based on experience, I do things that way round 'cos I know she knows less than the FM but just occasionally she springs a surprise.

johnincrete
Posts: 782
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:04 pm
Location: Chania

Re: smart phone app dictionary

Postby johnincrete » Sun Sep 04, 2016 7:32 am

Thanks everyone.

I guess it's going to be a long slog. I need to find an English speaking Greek 12-year old (remembering the advice we got with video players)


Return to “ Computers, TV, Telephone and Internet”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests