Baking Question

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Tim
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Baking Question

Postby Tim » Thu Apr 08, 2021 11:26 am

I thought I might make some pasties that I used to make in the UK. The recipe calls for shortcrust pastry. I found I was almost out of the Atora shredded suet I brought with me, so went to buy some. I ran 'suet' through Google Translate and got ξύγκι which translates as suet, tallow, lard. I couldn't find anything like it on the supermarket shelves, so asked a lady there who I know a little. I showed her the word on my phone and she had genuinely never heard of it. Nor had her colleague. I came away empty-handed. My question is: if Greeks make shortcrust pastry (and surely they do), what do they use for shortening? And where can I get some, please? Any answers gratefully received.

Tim

Kilkis
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Re: Baking Question

Postby Kilkis » Thu Apr 08, 2021 11:58 am

I've never used suet to make shortcrust pastry only to make suet pastry which is more spongy or mincemeat and Christmas puddings. I've always used lard, butter or a 50:50 mixture of butter and lard. Lard tends to make it very short so it is harder to roll out while butter alone tends to make a harder pastry. Personally I prefer all lard.

There is a white fat that comes in tubs and is usually found in supermarkets around the margarine area but I don't know what it is called. That makes quite reasonable pastry. I have never found suet anywhere in Greece and I have only found lard in shops specifically catering to English customers, e.g. Jon the Butcher in Vamos sells it.

Warwick

Kookla
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Re: Baking Question

Postby Kookla » Thu Apr 08, 2021 12:45 pm

I too only make shortcrust pastry without suet. As Warwick suggests the shops that cater to the Brit community would be your best bet.
I just use butter.
I think the fat in a tub to which Warwick refers is ΝΕΑ ΦΥΤΙΝΗ 400g. Used to just be a pale yellow plastic pot, but of late I’ve seen pale green (olive oil) and white. I do use this,( yellow pot) when making roast potatoes or toad in the hole etc.
Good luck in your quest and if you need help in eating them, quality control and such, give me a whistle!

Jeffstclair
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Re: Baking Question

Postby Jeffstclair » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:18 pm

I use olive oil to make pastry it works fine , I hav'nt made any for a while ...this seems good

http://www.fussfreecooking.com/recipe-c ... st-pastry/

Kookla
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Re: Baking Question

Postby Kookla » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:27 pm

μπολιά might be an option for suet in Greek?

Kilkis
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Re: Baking Question

Postby Kilkis » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:50 pm

Kookla wrote:...I think the fat in a tub to which Warwick refers is ΝΕΑ ΦΥΤΙΝΗ 400g...


That's the one. My late wife used to use it here to make pastry. The yellow pot but I think the contents were white. I must admit I very rarely bake so I have not used it myself. It looks like it might be primarily palm oil based so perhaps not a good choice ecologically? The white pots have 5% butter fat and the ones with a green tinge are 25 % olive oil.

Warwick

Clio
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Re: Baking Question

Postby Clio » Thu Apr 08, 2021 4:11 pm

For our first Christmas in Crete, many years ago, I wanted to make mincemeat - which of course, if you do it properly, and aren’t vegetarian, involves suet. I looked up the word for suet, (μπολιά as Kookla says) wrote it down and showed it to the butcher, with words for “kidney” and “fat” for good measure. He looked puzzled, but went backstage. Was gone for ages, but finally returned with the big handful of tiny fat-shrouded kidneys he'd just cut off umpteen lambs' carcasses. (Suet as we know it comes from the much larger pig or cow)

He then proceeded to pick off the fat coating painstakingly until he had the amount I needed. Was I sure that was enough? He was happy to do some more?

No I said that’ll be lovely. How much do I owe you?

“Don’t even think about it! And please have these too, on the house” he said, adding the kidneys to the pile. Oh, that graceful, open-handed Cretan generosity. I don’t half miss it.

P.S. As Warwick says the best shortcrust is half-and-half butter and lard. If you’re buying the latter from the English Butcher you could always try persuading him to pick the suet off a carcass…

Kilkis
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Re: Baking Question

Postby Kilkis » Thu Apr 08, 2021 5:53 pm

The suet I used to buy in the UK was always from beef although I have used a vegetarian variety. The lard I got from Jon the Butcher is pork lard, which I think is the most common type. I think most butchers would give you the fat from round the kidneys if they have it since they would normally trim it off and throw it away. I don't think Greeks would use it. I doubt if many would throw in the kidneys for free, Clio.

A friend of mine used to get a load of pig skin for free whenever she bought a joint of beef. Typically the beef here has almost no fat on it at all so she would wrap it in the pig skin to stop it drying out. She would then put the pig skin under the grill and make something that was somewhere between crackling and pork scratchings. Our local butcher knows to leave the skin on pork for his English customers but Greeks won't eat it except on young suckling pig.

You've started me thinking now. One local butcher raises and kills their own lambs. I wonder what they do with the sweetbreads.

Warwick

Tim
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Re: Baking Question

Postby Tim » Fri Apr 09, 2021 10:58 am

Many thanks for all your replies. I am hoping to get what I need at the British outlet closest to me, but can't travel there until restrictions are lifted further. In the meantime, I'll look out for the ΝΕΑ ΦΥΤΙΝΗ and try using μπολιά instead of ξύγκι. Thanks again.

Tim


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