Road Traffic signs

Chat and items of interest about Crete and Greece.
bobscott
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Road Traffic signs

Postby bobscott » Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:52 am

There seems to be a sudden proliferation of road traffic signs in our area, notifying motorists of bends and speed limits.

This prompted me to put to all you erudite folks on the forum a question which has been bugging me for a while.

Approach a village, see 40kph sign. Great. Leave village, see a cancellation sign of the 40kph. Question. Given the parlous state of most people's knowledge about precise speed limits on various sections of the road, would it not be a more effective use of resources to put, instead of the cancellation, a sign which indicates the speed limit on the next stretch of road? Like, instead of cancelling 40, why not put a sign to say that the limit is now 60, or 80, or whatever? It's not going to cost any more than the cancellation sign, and would be much more helpful.

It's not just Greece - I have seen the same in the UK and elsewhere in Europe.

I suppose there is a reason why this seemingly sensible suggestion of posting the new speed limit is not adopted and I wait for the wise heads on the forum to enlighten me. Thanks.
Yesterday today was tomorrow. Don't dilly dally!

Plodder
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Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2014 6:21 pm
Location: Elounda

Postby Plodder » Tue Oct 14, 2014 11:24 am

In the UK the answer is simple. Once the designated speed limit no longer applies, then it is the national speed limit, as shown by the black line on a white background.
The national speed limit varies depending on the type of vehicle driven, and whether a trailer is attached, thus, to put 60 for example, would be false, as that would apply to a car, but not an HGV.

Can't comment on Crete I'm afraid

Chris

john4d
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Location: Near Vamos

Postby john4d » Tue Oct 14, 2014 12:51 pm

In France don't they adopt a slightly different approach?

Each town or village has on it's approach it's name, and on it's exit it's name crossed out, both useful pieces of information. Between these signs the National urban speed limit applies. Outside of these signs the National Speed limit applies, being road and vehicle dependent. If the speed limit varies from the 'standard' then this is indicated.

This approach seems to have been adopted in Crete, but in a haphazard way.

In the UK the 30mph sign is always shown, leading to a proliferation of street furniture and additional expense and hazard. Of course the UK's quaint rules on continuous street lighting prevents the 'French System' being adopted.

John
There's no such thing as a bad taste joke

Kilkis
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Location: Near Chania

Postby Kilkis » Tue Oct 14, 2014 2:10 pm

john4d wrote:...This approach seems to have been adopted in Crete, but in a haphazard way...


I don't think it has been adopted in an "haphazard way", John. As far as I know it is adopted exactly as you describe in virtually all Greece. As with all things Greek, maintenance doesn't seem to be a high priority, so there are probably lots of cases where signs are missing but the rule itself is quite general.

1 If there is a specific speed sign it overrules any general speed limit.
2 Between city/town/village name signs, where the exit sign is crossed through, the urban limit of 50 kph applies.
3 Outside city/town/village the national limit of 90 kph applies.
4 For dual carriage ways, where there is a barrier between traffic travelling in opposite directions and barriers at the side of the road on each side, the limit is 110 kph.

I believe, but cannot conclusively prove, that the national highway along the north coast of Crete is an exception to these rules and 80 kph applies everywhere other than areas defined by items 1 and 2 above.

Warwick

Daisy
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Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2012 10:12 am
Location: Greece

Postby Daisy » Tue Oct 14, 2014 5:52 pm

My favourite derestriction sign in the world, is the one as you leave Ramsey, heading towards Douglas.
I remember overtaking a police car on that road at 125mph on my Honda CBR600.
I glanced in the car as I passed. The two policemen were sitting there looking really bored.
They were probably thinking, "Oh no. Here comes another one"
Daisy
:D

Loretta9

Postby Loretta9 » Tue Oct 14, 2014 6:10 pm

Daisy .. 125 MPH ? Douglas had little chance of getting out of the way. A bit dangerous, in fact you admit to heading directly towards him at high speed.
Criminal behaviour if you ask me.

filippos
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Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Postby filippos » Tue Oct 14, 2014 6:28 pm

Is the 9 your age?

Loretta9

Postby Loretta9 » Tue Oct 14, 2014 7:20 pm

no its my sense of humour on a scale of 1 to 10. Ten being "Infectious sense of humour"
I do know Motorbikes and Douglas are mutually linked to the Isle of Man.
ho,ho,ho,
Like you I assumed too much.

filippos
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Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Postby filippos » Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:27 pm

I had assumed you were trying humour.

bobscott
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Location: Kokkino Horio

Postby bobscott » Tue Oct 14, 2014 9:25 pm

Plodder wrote:In the UK the answer is simple. Once the designated speed limit no longer applies, then it is the national speed limit, as shown by the black line on a white background.
The national speed limit varies depending on the type of vehicle driven, and whether a trailer is attached, thus, to put 60 for example, would be false, as that would apply to a car, but not an HGV.

Can't comment on Crete I'm afraid

Chris


Thanks Plodder. Sounds a sensible explanation. As Warwick says in a later post, there are rules, but perversely they don't apply on the northern National Road in Crete. Where else in the world (Bangkok?) would you join a motorway with no notification of the speed you are supposed to be travelling at? (Consider the approach from Kalami - you are in the middle of a 60kph zone, but where does it tell you that?).
Yesterday today was tomorrow. Don't dilly dally!

bobscott
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Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:36 pm
Location: Kokkino Horio

Postby bobscott » Wed Oct 15, 2014 2:17 pm

bobscott wrote:
Plodder wrote:In the UK the answer is simple. Once the designated speed limit no longer applies, then it is the national speed limit, as shown by the black line on a white background.
The national speed limit varies depending on the type of vehicle driven, and whether a trailer is attached, thus, to put 60 for example, would be false, as that would apply to a car, but not an HGV.

Can't comment on Crete I'm afraid

Chris


On second thoughts, I am not sure the logic really works. A bus say, for argument's sake, that can only do a top speed of 80kph legally because of its size and nature, isn't going to zoom up to 90kph on the national road approaching Iraklio when is sees a 90 sign, is it? Yet a car, will indeed do that - and more, of course. It's the 'National speed limit' bit that doesn't seem to work well in Crete, and I go back to my assertion that to post the top speed limit (national speed limit if you like) for the next stretch of road, would be helpful (and as said before, no more costly than cancelling the previous limit).
Yesterday today was tomorrow. Don't dilly dally!

BrianS
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: Apokoronas

Re: Road Traffic signs

Postby BrianS » Sun Oct 19, 2014 1:19 pm

bobscott wrote:There seems to be a sudden proliferation of road traffic signs in our area, notifying motorists of bends and speed limits.


I think that the road traffic signs department could save a lot of money by not using the warning signs for bends. There are so many bends it would be more sensible to alert drivers to upcoming stretches of straight road.


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