Bravo Norway

Chat and items of interest about Crete and Greece.
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Bravo Norway

Postby TweetTweet » Tue Nov 10, 2015 2:25 pm

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/he ... 1207945262

I think it was Rudolf Steiner who said we *humanity* would have very few years viable survival if/when the bees disappeared. I would like to think that enough bees can survive and flourish long after *humanity* has been dealt with :)

Loretta9

Re: Bravo Norway

Postby Loretta9 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 11:26 pm

I think the, put crudely, damage to the Bee, is a direct result of the increase in the use of motor vehicles, exhaust fumes. That's it? Nothing fancy, nothing of scientific sexiness, nothing of great depth, just motor vehicle exhaust fumes.

George
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Location: Scotland

Re: Bravo Norway

Postby George » Fri Nov 13, 2015 2:21 am

It's November.
I live in a country with appalling weather.
Today I saw a large bumble bee in my garden.
We have lots of bee friendly plants.
We have two cars.

Kilkis
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Re: Bravo Norway

Postby Kilkis » Fri Nov 13, 2015 9:20 am

Actually it is well established that the problem is the luminiferous aether or, to be precise, the lack of it. Bees used the luminiferous aether to navigate but in 1887 Albert A. Michelson and Edward W. Morley carried out a famous experiment that proved that the luminiferous aether does not exist. Bees are notoriously slow readers and they have only just got round to reading the report of this experiment. With the luminiferous aether gone the Bee Research Establishment is furiously trying to find new ways to navigate but until they do so the number of hives suffering collapse will continue to grow.

Warwick

PS I do have to acknowledge that there are sections of the scientific community who don't agree with this dominant theory and believe that it is due to neonicotinoids, used in pesticides. "This theory has no merit whatsoever. Bees are obviously not pests so it is impossible for them to be affected by pesticides." said a spokesperson for the Agrochemical Research Science Establishment, also known as A.R.S.E.

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Re: Bravo Norway

Postby TweetTweet » Fri Nov 13, 2015 3:58 pm

Kilkis wrote:Warwick

PS I do have to acknowledge that there are sections of the scientific community who don't agree with this dominant theory and believe that it is due to neonicotinoids, used in pesticides. "This theory has no merit whatsoever. Bees are obviously not pests so it is impossible for them to be affected by pesticides." said a spokesperson for the Agrochemical Research Science Establishment, also known as A.R.S.E.


:)

Loretta9

Re: Bravo Norway

Postby Loretta9 » Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:08 pm

The number of and use of motor vehicles has increased by multi-millions in recent years. I would hazard a, lay person's, guess that exhaust fumes have affected Bees. I instinctively believe this to be the case.

George
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Location: Scotland

Re: Bravo Norway

Postby George » Sat Nov 14, 2015 4:57 pm

Many people in cities are now keeping bee hives and the bees are doing fine, unlike their countryside cousins with much less traffic pollution which would seem to point to some other problem. Sucking in exhaust fumes every day can't be healthy and I can testify to this having worked in garages for over 40 years. I haven't keeled over yet and neither have the bees in my garden.

Loretta9

Re: Bravo Norway

Postby Loretta9 » Sat Nov 14, 2015 7:15 pm

This from National Geographic : > >To a bee, no two flowers smell quite the same. When honeybees forage for flowers, they search for, learn, and memorize distinctive floral scents and return to the hive to tell other bees what they’ve found through their famous waggle dance.

It is an important ritual that is being disrupted by one of the most pervasive forms of air pollution—diesel exhaust—according to a new study published Thursday in Scientific Reports. The research pinpoints the mechanism by which the fuel-combustion pollutants degrade certain chemicals in floral odors. The absence of those chemicals affects honeybees’ ability to recognize the scent. (See related quiz: “What You Don’t Know About Cars and Fuel.”)<<

PS; This is the first time I have "researched" this topic. It just seems so obvious to me that Bees must be affected by the billions of cars on the planet. Bees are the size of the average thumbnail.. hardly the tolerance level of your average person.

Tim
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Re: Bravo Norway

Postby Tim » Sat Nov 14, 2015 7:23 pm

There was an interesting documentary on UK television last year which set out to identify the cause of the decline in the bee population. It looked at, among others, air pollution, pesticides and bee diseases. They concluded however that the chief cause of the decline was the vast acreages, huge in percentage terms of the countryside, that are given over to grass crops i.e. wheat, barley, haymeadow etc. Grasses don't set flowers, therefore there's not enough food for bees to thrive in the countryside. It would explain why they do well in built-up areas. The programme also did some calculations and worked out that unplanted field margins round each field (can't remember how wide) would produce enough wild flowers to reverse the declining trend.

Tim


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