Hello

For discussion, news, comments, questions and information about Crete & Greece.
raw
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2016 9:47 pm

Hello

Postby raw » Mon Dec 19, 2016 1:21 am

First and foremost, Hello.
My wife and I have been watching the forum for sometime, before placing our first posting.

We visited Crete this summer for 6 weeks, we were really taken with Sitia. So much so that we are seriously considering buying some land and having a house built there. We have lived in France for 14 years, but know that come Brexit the French will not be very welcoming to Brits.

We have spent 2016 touring Europe, from Portugal, through Spain, France (of course), Italy and then Greece. We like Napflio and Astros on the mainland, but we really love Sitia.

So basically we would like to hear from anyone about their views on our ambitions.

Thanks in advance.

PS we are really aware of the dreadful things going on in Greece and the hurt, so for us thats not an issue, we would be investing in Crete with our eyes ‘open’.

Kilkis
Posts: 8776
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: Hello

Postby Kilkis » Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:40 am

raw wrote:...We have lived in France for 14 years, but know that come Brexit the French will not be very welcoming to Brits...


I can't imagine the personal attitude of Greeks changing towards Brits but the legal position will be just the same as France. We won't know what that legal position is until negotiations are complete. There is a lot of talk from the UK side about various issues but the EU side are keeping pretty quiet until Article 50 is triggered. If I was in your position I wouldn't commit to anything until it becomes clear what the outcome is likely to be.

Of course you can make the opposite argument. One possible outcome is that EU nationals who live in the UK and UK nationals who live in the EU before date X can all stay. Therefore, it is better to get to where you want to be as soon as possible. There are a number of problems with this argument:

    1 We don't know what date X will be. It might be 23 June, in which case it is already too late.
    2 The agreement could include a time clause, e.g. those who have lived in the foreign country for more than Y years can stay.
    3 The EU tend to treat the EU as a single entity. If the agreement was such that you had the right to stay in the EU then it probably wouldn't matter in which country, i.e. you could still move from France to Greece after the agreement.
    4 There might not be an agreement. The UK keeps saying it wants an agreement of this sort but the EU simply says no negotiation until after Article 50 is triggered.

Just some thoughts. I can't advise on Sitia. I'm a west ender.

Warwick

altohb
Posts: 786
Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 2:51 pm
Location: Sitia

Re: Hello

Postby altohb » Mon Dec 19, 2016 9:01 am

I would agree with what Warwick is saying about the fallout from Brexit - none of us know what will happen and it may be that different countries approach a new relationship with the UK in totally different ways. Having said that, you obviously have experienced living in another EU country and have decided to give living in Crete a try so:

Sitia is a fairly small town. The relationship between local people and "foreigners" of all nationalities is generally good - maybe because there are not too many of us :) We have lived here for 10 years, and have found, overall, that the local people are more than willing to help, and dealing with various officials seems easier, overall, than is reported on this forum by some of those living in more populated areas.

Unlike more tourist orientated areas, Sitia is "open" all year round - one of the reasons we chose to live here. Most of the restaurants close in the winter, but the larger coffee places remain open, and sitting in a harbourside cafe with a log fire burning watching the world go by on a winter morning is wonderful. You will find that the majority of local people have at least some connection with olives and the harvest takes up a good deal of everyone's time between November and January, so don't expect anything to happen quickly during that period.

In line with the general thinking on the forum it would seem sensible to rent, initially, until you are sure that this is where you want to stay, although there is plenty of property for sale around - for instance, many British people I know have gone back to the UK for various reasons (though mainly to do with health). What the market in Greek owned property is like I have no idea, but I suspect that there are a good number of houses for sale in that sector as well - http://www.greekbay.gr/properties/ would indicate that this is the case.

As in all things - whatever you do, find yourself a good lawyer and accountant, and don't be pushed into using one recommended by an agent!

Good luck.

Kilkis
Posts: 8776
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: Hello

Postby Kilkis » Mon Dec 19, 2016 11:02 am

altohb wrote:...it may be that different countries approach a new relationship with the UK in totally different ways...


I don't think they can. Under EU law it is illegal to make bi-lateral deals. That is one of the arguments used in favour of Brexit. As long as the UK is in the EU it cannot make bi-lateral deals with any other country.

Warwick

filippos
Posts: 5310
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Re: Hello

Postby filippos » Mon Dec 19, 2016 1:22 pm

altohb wrote:........many British people I know have gone back to the UK for various reasons (though mainly to do with health).

That's something I don't understand. My wife and I have had quite a bit of contact with the medical services here including, in my case, major surgery. We've always received excellent treatment from GPs, A & E doctors and various consultants. Our experience is that medical care is excellent.

The only drawback we've encountered is the lack of an extended family to help with personal care in hospital, e.g. hair washing and the like, but we don't have an extended family anywhere else either. On the other hand, in the UK I doubt that my wife would have been able to spend up to 16 hours daily with me (poor woman) when I was in hospital for a month. Neither of us has any qualms about being treated here (despite hearing some 'horror' stories).

Also, access to medics and peripheral services is generally quick and straightforward. In how many places is it possible to walk into a specialist's office unannounced and be seen after waiting one's turn? Tests needed? Take the doctor's list of required tests to one of the many medical services places and, depending on the particular tests, collect the results within 24 hours. I've had MRI scans 'on demand' and the only test for which I needed an appointment (next day) was when injected with a radio-active marker for a scan.

altohb
Posts: 786
Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 2:51 pm
Location: Sitia

Re: Hello

Postby altohb » Mon Dec 19, 2016 1:42 pm

Most of the people I know who have returned to the UK for health reasons have been below state pension age, so given the cost of private health insurance I can understand in some cases. The limited exposure we've had to the Greek healthcare system has certainly given us no cause for complaint at all - excellent. The ramifications of Brexit with regard to health care are a worry to many, but we will just have to deal with it when it happens.

Eleni13
Posts: 466
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2007 11:13 am
Location: UK

Re: Hello

Postby Eleni13 » Mon Dec 19, 2016 4:43 pm

I have had limited experience of the Greek healthcare system, but I do know that the much missed Dr Elisabeth in Vamos diagnosed my husband's skin cancer in minutes, then our GP in the UK failed to take it seriously for three months. Yes, it mght have been fatal. On the other hand, Heraklion's raditherapy machines are broken so regularly and unpredictably, that a friend paid to go to Athens for treatment.
So there are two sides of the coin, for balance.

Maud
Posts: 447
Joined: Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:46 pm
Location: S.W. England/ S.W. Crete.

Re: Hello

Postby Maud » Mon Dec 19, 2016 6:56 pm

To get back to Sitia itself, (other issues aside for now), we have always liked the town. We recommended it to friends who stayed there for a week recently, and they enjoyed their holiday there. It has a very 'Greek working town' feel about it. - All very 'agricultural' ......as altohb mentions above. His advice about renting first is also worth considering.

Property in general is usually slightly cheaper in Eastern Crete, unless one is looking in areas like Elounda. Sitia still seems to offer a Greek lifestyle at a reasonable price. The weather is good in the Eastern end of the island, and there are some beautiful beaches.

Normally places become popular due to ease of access, beautiful locations, 'marketing' by travel agents....and then estate agents etc. Sitia has managed to retain its laid back atmosphere. It has always been a bit further from the airports than other holiday destinations, (until the newly extended airport opened), and it doesn' t have the magnificent backdrop of Mount Ida or the Lefka Ori Range, but it is still a lovely little town. If you are looking for a real Greek atmosphere and a small friendly place, you could do a lot worse!- If you liked Napflio, then I can see why Sitia appealed to you. You have obviously done your 'homework.'

Kilkis
Posts: 8776
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: Hello

Postby Kilkis » Mon Dec 19, 2016 10:36 pm

When I was looking for property, about 12 years ago, I also liked Sitia itself. Two things put me off.

    1 There was nothing for sale in or very close to Sitia. Everything available was in very small villages many km away with absolutely no amenities.
    2 Sitia seemed so far from Heraklion. The road from Heraklion to around the Ierapetra turn off is fine. From there to Sitia it was just a slow crawl.

I think all parts of the island have their attractions and their disadvantages. I would suggest people draw up a list of priorities and use that as a guide. For me, having a sea view would have been very nice but it wasn't the most important characteristic so in the end it went by the board. If you are young, being half way up a mountain can be fine but how will it seem in 10 or 20 years time? I never use public transport but I took it into account because one day someone will tell me I can't drive anymore. I hope it won't be for a long time, since I have had personal transport since I was 4, but it is bound to happen one day. My only hope is that driverless cars will then be common and affordable.

Warwick

raw
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2016 9:47 pm

Re: Hello

Postby raw » Mon Dec 19, 2016 11:00 pm

Thank you everyone for your input. Especially the information about Sitia.

We are looking into renting, watching what Brexit brings (or not) and we are also considering purchasing something over 250k to gain residency (as a 'CURRENT' EU citizen from advice I have received this is possible, although the scheme is really aimed at those from outside the EU).

Of course this may not be required depending upon the negotiations, but the way the UK government are behaving goodness knows what the outcome of the negotiations is going to be and how long it will take!


Return to “General Discussion & News”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 3 guests