Tax resident in Greece < 183 days ?

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mgm
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:49 am

Tax resident in Greece < 183 days ?

Postby mgm » Tue May 09, 2017 3:40 pm

What if I am not physically present in Greece for more of 183 days every year, but still receive pension here to Greek bank account (and pay tax to Greek state) , and at the same time have dual domicile in another country, can I drive car in Greece registered in that country where I have second domicile (actually Non-EU country) ?

Thanks.

Source:

http://www.livingincrete.net/tax.html

Mixos
Posts: 352
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:26 am
Location: North East Crete or S.W.England

Re: Tax resident in Greece < 183 days ?

Postby Mixos » Tue May 09, 2017 8:00 pm

As I understand it, you can drive a car in Greece which is registered in any other country, for up to six months in a year, but the car must then be out of Greece for the other six months. In other words, you can't simply drive into Albania or get the ferry to Italy for a few days. I don't think it matters where you are domiciled, or where you pay your tax, as long as you observe this rule. The issue is the registration of the car. I trust somebody will correct me if I am wrong! (That said, I know a number of ex-pats who flout this rule and -- so far -- have got away with it.)

Kilkis
Posts: 8773
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: Tax resident in Greece < 183 days ?

Postby Kilkis » Tue May 09, 2017 9:36 pm

It might be a bit more complicated than that, Mixos. The only rule I know of specifically is Directive 83/182/EEC and that only deals with driving a car registered in one EU country, say Country A, in another EU country, say country B. It specifically applies to residents of country A being able to drive it in country B. That indeed allows you to drive it for 6 months. It wouldn't allow a resident of country B to drive it for six months and, indeed, Greece about ten years ago used that rule to confiscate cars and impose massive fines, often wrongly according to the Commission.

It should be noted that the Directive talks about being resident, not tax resident, so the link mgm referred to is not really relevant. Residence is largely determined by an 185 day rule but with the usual waffle about personal ties etc. You can see a lot of the text here but for some reason not all of it.

The Directive doesn't say anything about cars registered in non-EU countries, which appears to be mgm's case. This UK document allows any foreign registered vehicle to be driven in the UK for up to six months, again providing the person driving it is not UK resident. It refers to a Vienna convention in 1968 so it is possible that the same rule applies in Greece but I don't honestly know.

Warwick

PS I have no idea why mgm is regarded as tax resident in Greece if he lives here for less than 183 days and has no income in Greece. Poor accountant?

mgm
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:49 am

Re: Tax resident in Greece < 183 days ?

Postby mgm » Tue May 09, 2017 9:54 pm

PS I have no idea why mgm is regarded as tax resident in Greece if he lives here for less than 183 days and has no income in Greece. Poor accountant?


If I receive pension from abroad which is taxed in Greece, this is income in Greece, correct or wrong ? :-)

Kilkis
Posts: 8773
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Re: Tax resident in Greece < 183 days ?

Postby Kilkis » Wed May 10, 2017 12:00 am

mgm wrote:...If I receive pension from abroad which is taxed in Greece, this is income in Greece, correct or wrong ? :-)


If the income arises outside Greece then it is NOT income in Greece. The fact that is deposited in a Greek bank from the country of origin does not make it income in Greece. How it is taxed depends on a number of things:

    1 Where you are registered as tax resident? Most of the people I know are registered as tax resident in their country of origin, e.g. the UK. Their pension arises in their country of origin and remains taxable in their country of origin. Normally it would not then be liable for tax in Greece and they submit a null return to the Greek tax authority.
    2 Personally I am registered as tax resident in Greece and so I have to declare my worldwide income to the Greek tax authority. Where each income stream is taxable depends on the Double Taxation Agreement between the Greek tax authority and the tax authority in the country of origin. In my case some income is taxed in Greece and some in the UK.
    3 If a pension provider in the country of origin pays the pension into a bank in that country or pays it directly into a Greek bank is irrelevant. It is where the income arises that matters not where it is deposited. All my income goes directly into a UK bank and I transfer money as I need it but it is still liable for tax in Greece. I have friends who are not registered as tax resident here but have their pension paid directly into a Greek bank from the UK and their pension is still taxed in the UK.

Warwick


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