American Couple with initial questions

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etalmant
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 4:19 pm

American Couple with initial questions

Postby etalmant » Tue Mar 13, 2007 5:15 pm

Hello all. Ya sas! Ella re?

This is our first post, and are thankful for this type of resource!

My wife and I are both U.S. citizens. We have saved up, etc. and are seriously considering moving to Chania or to a village near there.

I used to date a woman from Chania, and spent 9 months living there. First near the city center, and then in Nea Hora back in 2001-2002.

My wife and I have budgeted that we would have 2000 euros per month to live on for at least several years, and we are wanting to first know (before tackling all of the red tape, etc.) what kind of a standard of living to expect for that amount of money?

Back in 2001, I believe that our rent in Nea Hora was just under 200 euros for a studio apartment that was right on the sea. However, I really do not remember how much money we were spending on food and the other things that go with daily living. This is where I thought I might get some help from this board?

We currently live a somewhat frugal lifestyle, and are not all about keeping up with the latest and greatest. I would say that we would be comfortable living a modest lifestyle, whatever that is!

Can anyone make any suggestions as to how we would fare on 2000 euros a month?

I will say that I do like eating meat, and it is a staple in my diet. I remember that getting beef and chicken in Chania was relatively expensive, but it was something that I did not want to go without. Have things changed much?

I thank everyone in advance for their time and their help in replying to my questions. Efharisto poli!

Eric

daveg

Postby daveg » Tue Mar 13, 2007 6:55 pm

Personal opinion would be that you should be fine on 2000 a month,me my wife one son and two dogs :) survive on a lot less! ok we do lead a very simple life and are not out everynight partying.
Also If you can stick mainly to local produce if will save you a lot and you will find pork is a lot cheaper than beef here.
Don't know about rent in that area but I'm sure I've seen adverts on forums recently for properties for rent ooop west for around the 3-400euros a month.
DaveG

etalmant
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 4:19 pm

Postby etalmant » Tue Mar 13, 2007 7:02 pm

Dave;

Thank you for the reply!

As for your dogs, did you bring them from somewhere else?

We have two beautiful female dogs (German shepherd purebred and a German/Aussie Shepherd mix) that we would be wanting to bring if/when we move, and we are just starting to research the red tape behind all of it.

Can you help out? Pointers? Tips? Your experience?

Eric

etalmant
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 4:19 pm

Postby etalmant » Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:02 pm

We went ahead and purchased Carol's book, as it seems to cover everything!

However, any information regarding my initial post or about bringing dogs would be appreciated!

Efharisto poli.

Eric

daveg

Postby daveg » Wed Mar 14, 2007 8:35 am

Just a couple of things about larger dogs, most of the Greek/Cretan population are VERY afraid of larger dogs so be prepared for the reaction and no amount of pleading will convince most people that the dogs are safe [This is much worse in the villages, where we used to live the villagers used to walk the other side of the road furiously crossing themselves]
Also poisoning can be a real problem so get yourself an antidote pack from the vet and talk to other dog owners in your area about dangerous areas and times of year.
Heres our two! the smaller cross collie we flew from the UK and the larger cross German sheperd/Cretan hound we had as a pup from one of the few rescue homes here.
Image Image
DaveG

etalmant
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 4:19 pm

Postby etalmant » Wed Mar 14, 2007 1:14 pm

Dave:

Cool looking dogs!

What did you need to do for the collie when you flew it over? Quarrantine period?

What exactly do you mean about poisoning? We would be keeping our dogs inside with us most of the time. They would certainly sleep inside with us.

I remember that my old girlfriend's father had a pair of dogs stolen from his olive groves when I lived there. It really upset him.

I figured that the larger breeds bring some difficulty, because I do not recall seeing many large dogs when I lived in Chania.

I suppose one of our challenges while at first renting will be to find an accepting landlord.

Carolina
Site Admin
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Postby Carolina » Wed Mar 14, 2007 6:17 pm

Yiassou Eric,

I agree with Dave that you should be fine on 2000 euros a month, and pork and chicken are the cheapest meats. Local lamb is v. expensive. You can still eat out for 10 euros a head for a main course, salad and village wine - if you chose the right tavernas and don't over-order on the starters. That's where I fall down - I can't help it , the starters are so delicious and I end up ordering more than I can eat (it's a Greek thing 8) ).

Regarding rents - the prices vary a lot depending where you are. The villages are generally cheaper, and the Nea Hora area is still pretty reasonable. You should find something for 300 to 400 E for a one or two bedroomed place.

There's also some info on costs of telephone, electricty, water, internet etc etc in my book which is winging it's way to you (thanks for the order!).

daveg

Postby daveg » Wed Mar 14, 2007 8:52 pm

Hi Eric
as to the medical requirements to fly my wifes collie out here she had to have various jabs but no quarantine period, a pet passport would be required if we ever had to fly here back to the UK. For your dogs it would be best to check with the Greek consul in the states as regulations appear to vary from country to country.

The poisoning of animals is a problem here for pet owners whether it is intentional or not I know of at least 5 strays and a few household pets that have died through poison. No one appears to know the real truth about this, Is it to keep down vermin? or to keep down the stray population of cats and dogs? But it Does happen and poison is left near bins and other places where animals may go so be very careful even when just walking the dogs on leads.

And finally Yes when we first arrived here we moved into a Real Cretan Village and apart from the worry of a few Ya Ya's about the dogs in the house When our son was in there too!!! Panagia moo :shock: we had no problem with our landlord, but when we had to move nearer the coast [For work and other reasons] it took us about three months to find a suitable house that would also allow dogs. We recently moved house and again about three months searching but it was worth it as we are now in a lovely small house with stunning views and a massive garden so the properties are out there they just take time to find.
Good luck in whatever you decide!
DaveG

Mary
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 11:06 am
Location: California, USA

Postby Mary » Thu Mar 15, 2007 6:28 am

Hello Everyone,

I was curious if the amount of 2000 euros per month is including the cost of having a car? I read somewhere that a couple can live in Crete for about 11,000 per year. That must be old information or very miss leading. I keep on dreaming of going back and hope it will happen soon .

Mary

Carolina
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Postby Carolina » Fri Mar 16, 2007 12:31 am

Mary wrote:
I was curious if the amount of 2000 euros per month is including the cost of having a car? I read somewhere that a couple can live in Crete for about 11,000 per year.


Hi Mary,

It's pretty hard to put a figure on as everyone lives differently. What do you include and exclude ? Rent, mortgage or neither, home insurance, health insurance or neither, telephone calls (landline and mobile - how many calls, to where), internet, car (& car size & how many km do you travel) meals out twice a week or twice a month, eating a lot of meat and readymade food or cooking home grown vegetable dishes. Air con and central heating or fans and wood burning stoves?

On 2,000 euros you are likely to be comfortable, and it's possible to live on half of that. I also expect that the figures you read were if you own a home and don't pay rent or mortgage. If you read Dave's first post again he says "me my wife one son and two dogs survive on a lot less! ok we do lead a very simple life and are not out everynight partying".

claireD
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 1:19 am
Location: Vancouver Canada

Pets to Crete from North America

Postby claireD » Wed Apr 11, 2007 8:36 pm

Hi Eric, we are a Canadian/British couple who plan to move to Crete after my husband retires in the next year or two. We have four cats, so are also quite concerned about Greek regulations etc. I found this URL to an online retail source for bilingual copies of the Pet Immigration Forms, Import Applications and entry instructions for most countries including Greece: http://www.pettravel.com/

You will certainly need the Immigration Form - EU Form 998 Greece.
which is for sale on that site....(hope link works!) as well as lots of info on moving your pets.

We are lucky to have a veterinarian who has been thru the process before, and has promised to help us. Maybe your local vet can offer some assistance in the planning process. About 6 months before the move, we plan to visit the Greek Consulate here in Vancouver and make sure we have our ducks in a row. I do know that timing is crucial for some of the shots.

My best friend lives in Crete and has a big, beautiful labrador retriever. He is the second one she has had, because the first one died of poisoning when it was quite young. It was a horrible experience, and she learned to be very protective of her dog. He is never unattended when outside, and not allowed to eat anything he finds lying around on walks. Like your dogs, he always sleeps indoors. He is the happiest dog I've ever known and loves the extra attention. I'm sure your dogs will be fine. Hope I can say the same for our cat family! I have nightmares about getting them over there, and have researched the various airlines and their reputations for animal care enroute. So far, it seems that Lufthansa Air Freight is by far the superior choice. But I don't know whether they would get us as far as Heraklion, or even Athens. Lots more research to do.

Anyhow, good luck! Crete is just a wonderful place, and we are looking forward to living there, too. :D

claire


p.s. Do you have any great suggestions for private health care insurance over there? In Canada we don't need it, so this is all new territory for us.

Carolina
Site Admin
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Postby Carolina » Sat Apr 14, 2007 11:39 am

Hi Claire,

There is a previous thread about Greek health insurers here:

http://livingincrete.net/board/viewtopi ... =insurance

Policies range from full cover for every medical scenario, to minimal cover.

If you contact any of the companies listed they should be able to give you information in English regarding their choices for medical / healthcare policies. If you have any difficulty obtaining information from any of them let me know and I can give you local contact details & email of English speaking agents who work for these companies.

Good luck to you and your cats!


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