Water.How will Crete cope ?

For discussion, news, comments, questions and information about Crete & Greece.
Kenny

Water.How will Crete cope ?

Postby Kenny » Fri May 18, 2007 4:36 pm

Just a thought.With the general lack of rain and snow in the winter will their be a water shortage this summer?

Building developements seem to be on the increase and more foriegners are settling on the Island.That combined with tourists expecting their daily showers could their be water rationing? Ken.

filippos
Posts: 5334
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Postby filippos » Fri May 18, 2007 6:49 pm

That could depend on where you are. Broadly speaking the west has more water than elsewhere which may explain why it's the greenest part of the island. Most of the Greek people I know in our area seem to think there won't be any real problem. Certainly, at least one of our neighbours still hoses all round the verandahs and the roadside path at least twice a day. In the south and east it could be a different story and that's before they build more golf courses with their huge demand for water.

Another factor, as you say, is the large number of immigrants buying property and many of them have pools which accounts for some extra water usage when evaporation and cleaning filters by backwashing are taken into account. Also, many Cretan families, as they become better, off are buying more domestic appliances, especially washing machines and dishwashers. Add tourist requirements that probably include at least one daily shower, beach showers, rinsing swimsuits etc., etc.

Then there's infrastructure, or lack of it. Two or three years ago one village near us for a period of about three weeks only had water for a couple of hours during the night. That was nothing to do with shortage of water but there had been many holiday and residential homes built so instead of the original eight or so houses of the old village there were thirty. Huge increase in water use but the supply pipe hadn't been upgraded. That's *the* supply pipe and, so far as I recall it was at most 25mm.

All the concrete for new building uses a lot of water, not just to mix but to keep it damp after it's poured. Our neighbours are building now and the roof was poured a week ago. For two days they had a sprinkler going throughout daylight hours and since then it's had two daily soakings lasting an hour or more each time - multiply by the number of new buildings ... ...

Ah, but it's raining now.**

Filippos.

** But not much.

Nita
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue May 15, 2007 4:59 pm
Location: Chania

Postby Nita » Fri May 18, 2007 8:57 pm

I don't know about 'not much' here in Agia Marina it's chucking it down, with more rain forecast for tomorrow :cry:

As for my Greek friends and neighbours they won't think there is a problem until they turn on the tap and nothing comes out, or the pressure is very low!

For the last three years, in the winter and spring months particularly, we have had odd days with no water (including last October when there was severe flooding) and often the pressure is extremely low, including today, so it's almost impossible to shower. There is never a warning nor explanation, although it does give rise to heated debates at the nearby Kafenio.

Retired in Crete

Postby Retired in Crete » Fri May 18, 2007 9:14 pm

filippos wrote:
In the south and east it could be a different story and that's before they build more golf courses with their huge demand for water.
Filippos.



I wonder why you think it could be a different story in the east? (I cannot speak for the south)

The majority of the new building developments are in the west end and I recall reports last summer of parts of the west end being without water for 3 days due to the ancient infrastructure (if I remember correctly a pump broke down and the man with the key to the pumproom was in Athens for the weekend!)

Unlike the west end the east does not rely on snow from the mountains for water as the mountains in the east are not as high as those in the west so they get far less snow. The reservoir just outside Ierapetra is at normal levels for this time of year.

I have no insider knowledge of the number of tourists expected this year but from the low airfares currently being offered I would guess that bookings are way down this year. (Friends of ours have today paid £124 return in August, the English schools summer holidays - they paid double this last year)

So Kenny, don't worry, be happy - it all looks good in the east!

John

filippos
Posts: 5334
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Postby filippos » Fri May 18, 2007 9:22 pm

Nita wrote:I don't know about 'not much' here in Agia Marina it's chucking it down, with more rain forecast for tomorrow
I spent the day strapped to a hortokoptiko and although it rained it was never more than a few spots - not enough to stop me working, unfortunately. It's raining a bit harder now but still only like an English Spring shower. We're about as for East of Hania as you are to the West; what a difference a few kilometres can make.

Nita wrote:As for my Greek friends and neighbours they won't think there is a problem until they turn on the tap and nothing comes out, or the pressure is very low!
Quite right. There isn't a problem until it happens. It might never but if (when) it does, as you say, it livens up the kafeneio, too.

Nita wrote:For the last three years, ... we have had odd days with no water (including last October when there was severe flooding)
Probably flooded the pumping station. We were lucky as the village is at the top of a hill and it was those lower down who got caught.

Nita wrote:and often the pressure is extremely low, including today, so it's almost impossible to shower.
We're obviously luckier than you - our water pressure only goes that low two or three times a year and usually only for a very few hours - from two or three to about six at most. At least in summer we can swim to freshen up a bit.

Filippos.

Kenny

Postby Kenny » Fri May 18, 2007 9:24 pm

Retired in Crete wrote:[
So Kenny, don't worry, be happy - it all looks good in the east!

John


Thats just what I wanted to hear John.You have made my day :wink: Ken.

paulh
Posts: 2435
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 7:13 pm
Location: Akrotiri

Postby paulh » Fri May 18, 2007 9:25 pm

Just to add in a factor that nobody has included yet. There is much more agricultural water being used than say 20 years ago with frequent irrigation of crops being the norm now not the exception. In that respect I just wonder if agriculture or houses use up more water per equivalent area.

In the long run I see desalination plants being essential to Crete.

I believe there are new dams under construction (or planned) but I only hazily remember reading this so not sure where they are located.

filippos
Posts: 5334
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Postby filippos » Fri May 18, 2007 9:36 pm

Retired in Crete wrote:[I wonder why you think it could be a different story in the east? (I cannot speak for the south)
Statistically, the East gets a bit less rain than the west and, as you say, John there's not so much snow. I think the south is even drier.

Retired in Crete wrote:The majority of the new building developments are in the west end and I recall reports last summer of parts of the west end being without water for 3 days due to the ancient infrastructure
I did mention the antiquated infrastructure and that particular problem lasted a lot longer than a three day pump failure.

Retired in Crete wrote:I have no insider knowledge of the number of tourists expected this year but from the low airfares currently being offered I would guess that bookings are way down this year. (Friends of ours have today paid £124 return in August, the English schools summer holidays - they paid double this last year)
You could well be right. Maybe people are hoping for a blazing summer at home in the UK. If it doesn't happen there could be a late rush of bookings. Time will tell.

filippos.

HPeponi
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 2:06 pm
Location: SE Crete

Postby HPeponi » Fri May 18, 2007 11:38 pm

Here in the SE we have stiffled our glee as the fluffy rain clouds brewed, then disappeared, for most of the day The most excited we got was at 7ish this evening when the outside wall was almost covered in rain drops!

This year, for the first time in over 20 years, there was not a single daisy (Margarita) to entwine in our May Day "stefani" and the greenhouse owners are more than worried about how they will water their produce. We are being rationed as to how often we water our olive trees and anything above a certain amount of water per tree is to be set at a more expensive tariff.

Are we worried here in the SE?.....Yes we are. With so many golf courses (ha ha) in the pipeline for this area I think Paulh is right on target when he says the way forward for Crete is via desalination plants.

Hudson
Posts: 190
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 12:35 pm
Location: East Crete

Postby Hudson » Sat May 19, 2007 5:44 am

paulh wrote:t I just wonder if agriculture or houses use up more water per equivalent area.


To give you a rough answer - I put 7 hrs water on my land every 3 weeks.

7 hrs @40,000 ltr p.h (approximately) = 280,000 ltrs
divide by 21 equates to 13,333.33 ltrs per day
divide by size of land 12,940 sq mtrs = 1.03 ltrs per day per sq mtr (approx)

From this I would guess that my land takes less water than the house and I don't have a swimming pool!

paulh
Posts: 2435
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 7:13 pm
Location: Akrotiri

Postby paulh » Sat May 19, 2007 10:26 am

ok so a house built on one stremata would have to use 1000 litres of water per day to equal the agricultural usage for the same stremata put to agriculture.

I know household usage adds up but does it get near to 1000 litres per day every day? I really have no idea but it sounds a lot

My point is not about agricultural watering which we all benefit from one way or another it is about the concept of an area not having as many houses therefore not using as much water. I'm not sure that is as correct as it first sounds

Of course a lot of building is done on ground which is unsuitable for agriculture so the comparison does not apply but I just wondered what the values were where it does apply.

Hudson
Posts: 190
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 12:35 pm
Location: East Crete

Postby Hudson » Sat May 19, 2007 12:27 pm

paulh wrote:ok so a house built on one stremata would have to use 1000 litres of water per day to equal the agricultural usage for the same stremata put to agriculture.

I know household usage adds up but does it get near to 1000 litres per day every day? I really have no idea but it sounds a lot.


If you just take the usage of water per sq mtr of house then it is most likely a lot higher.

10 houses at 100sqmtrs is probably more than 1000 ltrs.

If you take just one house on a stremma then maybe you are right but don't forget to water the garden :D

Don't forget that the water for agriculture is not the same as that which comes out of the taps in the towns. Well, at least they say it isn't.

filippos
Posts: 5334
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:38 pm
Location: Kalyves
Contact:

Postby filippos » Sat May 19, 2007 2:22 pm

Hudson wrote:Don't forget that the water for agriculture is not the same as that which comes out of the taps in the towns. Well, at least they say it isn't.
But doesn't it all come from the same sources with just a difference in treatment?

filippos.

footscapes
Posts: 395
Joined: Fri May 18, 2007 8:37 am
Location: Crete no longer!

Postby footscapes » Sat May 19, 2007 3:36 pm

We live about 2kms outside the village of Kastellos (Rethymno nomos). Our water is from a spring which rises several kms away, being routed through various concrete holding tanks before it reaches us. The last of these tanks (i.e., our immediate supply) is only about half a km from the house. The tank has baffles, dividing it into 3 compartments. One of these supplies our property (and other houses), the other two are used for agricultural offtake. In other words, exactly the same supply feeds both domestic and agricultural needs locally, with no difference in treatment.

Paul

Hudson
Posts: 190
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 12:35 pm
Location: East Crete

Postby Hudson » Sat May 19, 2007 4:13 pm

The ag. water to our land comes part of the way through metal pipes. We're told that this is one of the reasons it is unsuitable for drinking. I suppose that plus only 2 out of maybe 3 filters could make sense. We still use it for everythingelse though as we have no connection to "mains" water.


Return to “General Discussion & News”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests