good detailled maps

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Anne Bilbrough
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good detailled maps

Postby Anne Bilbrough » Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:30 am

Hi any recommendations for detailled maps of Western Crete please - something to show smaller villages, maybe even tracks/footpaths, perhaps with an index
Not sure what scale 1:50,000 ??
Thanks, Anne

Jean
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Postby Jean » Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:52 am

http://www.stanfords.co.uk/stock/greece ... as-167884/

Alternatively you can buy it in Greece where it is a little cheaper http://www.anavasi.gr/en/greece.php?c=13

Anne Bilbrough
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Location: north yorkshire

Postby Anne Bilbrough » Fri Feb 26, 2010 4:16 pm

thank you ! Anne

Polyanna
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Postby Polyanna » Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:39 pm

Good luck with the search for detailed information! I have bought several maps of Western Crete over the years and have found them to be at best only indicative of the road system and sometimes downright misleading. Sometimes villages are incorrectly named, or even shown in the wrong location, so the road you are looking for is before or after the village rather than as shown on the map. I was always puzzled by these inaccuracies until I actually read the small print at the bottom of one of my maps which said that "Some information may not be accurate to avoid copyright problems". Well, there you are then. Magical mystery tours are more fun anyway. We are in Crete, after all!

thebigbluecheese
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Postby thebigbluecheese » Sat Feb 27, 2010 2:09 pm

Try google earth

filippos
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Postby filippos » Sat Feb 27, 2010 9:15 pm

Polyanna wrote:l I actually read the small print at the bottom of one of my maps which said that "Some information may not be accurate to avoid copyright problems".
We had one of these maps years ago. It's a common ploy with map publishers almost everywhere, including the Ordnance Survey. They will put in tiny errors that make no practical difference to the usefulness of the map so that they'll be able to spot breach of copyright if another publisher reproduces the map. They can't be easy to spot or they'd have no value. The sort of thing they do is, say, have one windmill symbol that has a corner missing from one of its sails, or misplace a canal lock by 30 metres or incorrectly put a double letter in the name of some obscure hamlet. There will be, maybe 20 or 30 such tiny errors on every sheet of an Ordnance Survey map and most other map serious publishers do the same. On Greek maps, I believe, deliberate errors include such things as misplacing the tonos on a word.

For evidence they record every error and have the documents, along with the correct version sealed in an envelope which is notarised and then, so I was told, the whole thing is sealed in a separate envelope which is mailed to the Notary by registered post so there's independent date evidence. The documents will only see daylight again if a copyright case reaches court when the envelopes will be opened by a court official.

That said, I'm not sure the publishers of Cretan maps are quite so subtle and, as you say, the mapping errors, whether deliberate or otherwise can make a day out pretty interesting. You get to see places you'd never set out to visit.

paulh
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Postby paulh » Sun Feb 28, 2010 2:51 am

there is also the concept to consider that the Greek islands were considered the buffer zone between the mainland and any invader and as part of the national security perimeter no or misleading detail was all that was available in the interests of security. Not saying that is a current concept but for maps dated and produced from historical info it can be a consideration in terms of accuracy.

SatCure
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Postby SatCure » Sun Feb 28, 2010 9:31 am

thebigbluecheese wrote:Try google earth

It appears to be around ten years out of date.
Even my satnav map is around that age, showing exits on the National road that no longer exist and omitting roads that were built some years ago. (Last week it was encouraging me to drive through the Potamon reservoir!)

Clio
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Postby Clio » Sun Feb 28, 2010 12:10 pm

If you think about it, maps are produced a) in the public interest by governments or b) for commercial consumption. As regards b) in Crete, few Cretans (apart from those with a specialist interest in climbing) use maps. The vast majority of tourists want maps that just get them from A to B on main routes; they’re not into walking in the hills. So there isn’t likely to be much commercial return on a big cartographic investment on Ordnance Survey lines.

Neither is the Greek government into spending money on a freely available Ordnance Survey equivalent. Even if they had the dosh and the inclination, there is the security reservation.

As Paul says, Crete counts as one of the politically sensitive border areas so although the island, along with the rest of the country, is thoroughly mapped by the Army Geophysical Service, the maps are not publicly available. (I think one member of this board may have a private copy but understandably he doesn’t put it about!)

A further complication: most people who use maps want them for walking or driving. On roads, tracks, footpaths. In Crete the rural road network is constantly evolving, much more so than in the UK, so no printed map is going to be able to keep up.

Magical mystery tours are more fun anyway


Of course they are and I’ve had some great ones. In Crete they can also be deadly dangerous. My fervent advice, based on one very hairy experience and a couple of lesser but still unpleasant ones, is to use any map of the island as a guide, not as gospel. Don’t ever assume that it is accurate, and remember that getting lost in Crete, especially in the mountains, can kill you.

On the positive side: the maps are improving. As Jean says, the most detailed and most up-to-date for general use – i.e. covering the whole island – is the Anavasi 1:50,000 Road and Touring Atlas. It’s fine to keep at home or to take in the car, but it’s a weighty ring-bound tome which you wouldn’t want in a rucsac. I emailed the publisher about this and they replied

“during the first months of 2010 there will be a new edition of the Atlas of Crete, with many additions and a new, more portable, format.”.


Last time I looked it hadn’t yet hit the bookshops, but it may be worth waiting until the season opens in Easter to get the new edition.

Jean
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Postby Jean » Sun Feb 28, 2010 12:48 pm

the maps are not publicly available. (I think one member of this board may have a private copy but understandably he doesn’t put it about!)


They are available and can be bought if you go to their office in Athens. But not all of them (for example not Akrotiri or Sfakia).

Anne Bilbrough
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Location: north yorkshire

Postby Anne Bilbrough » Sun Feb 28, 2010 1:06 pm

Good morning one and all :D
Thanks ever so much for your replies - have had a look at the Road atlas mentioned and thats exactly what I'm after - good to know theres a lighter version on the way and I may hold out for that

My Dad used to drive down every road that said dead end when i was a kid so mystery tours are familiar ground and I agree they're great fun
I kind of want the map for walking/having better idea where it's permisible to go but also to just get more familiar with place names/where places are in relation to each other and some idea of the lie of the land
have bused and driven around everytime I've been in Crete and really looking forward to more exploring

Re deliberate mistakes yes I see why it happens and anyone who's driven in rural Cumbria has probably not only been confused by raod signs that were turned round during the war to confuse the enemy and never got turned back but also the local dialect that gets you lost faster than anything - -I was sent one night to a meeting at a place I was told was TREE-PENER to put it phonetically....I couldn't fond it, asked directions again, still couldn't find it then when I stopped someone in the village of Torpenhow they thought I'd gone crazy because I was in the village...yes TREEPENER is how Cumbrians pronounce Torpenhow :lol:

Thanks again for all your imput
Anne

Clio
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Postby Clio » Sun Feb 28, 2010 2:14 pm

They are available


That's good to know, Jean. Last time I tried there was nothing at all available for Crete, but now I come to think about it that was more than a decade ago. Obviously things have relaxed a bit of late and next time I'm in Athens I shall go and chat up the nice soldiers.

Clio
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Postby Clio » Sun Feb 28, 2010 2:18 pm

TREEPENER is how Cumbrians pronounce Torpenhow


Sounds a bit like a Sfakian might pronounce it!

footscapes
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Maps

Postby footscapes » Mon Mar 01, 2010 3:19 pm

If anyone uses a Garmin mapping GPS (Oregon, Colorado etc) there is some very useable, accurate and free mapping of the whole of Greece at http://mapdekode.iol.gr/map_index.htm

Screenshot of part of the Crete map set here http://i1009.photobucket.com/albums/af2 ... es/map.jpg as it looks in the Garmin Mapsource PC software, from where you can then squirt it into your handheld GPS.

Paths aren't comprehensive, but those that are there are accurate. (We tried it out from Nidha plain to Psiloritis summit & the path shown was absolutely spot on). It's useful for mountain biking too.

You need 2 bits of (free) software to process the maps into Mapsource (cgpsmapper amd mapsourcetoolkit) from http://freegeographytools.com/2007/addi ... -mapsource and there are some better instructions for the conversion process at http://cypherman1.googlepages.com/intruction_en

It is a bit fiddly, but the results are worth the effort.

Paul


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