Babies

For discussion, news, comments, questions and information about Crete & Greece.
JulieC
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2007 12:20 pm

Babies

Postby JulieC » Fri Sep 21, 2007 9:00 am

Hi all hope you all well

We are moving 1 week today - very very excited now!!
We have an 19 month old which is great and I have just found out that I am pregnant (very very happy)
Can anyone help with regard to what I would do out there, obviously I am aware we need health insurance but is it the same as here where we could get to a know a certain doctor (or surgery at least) I had a few problems with Sienna (v high blood pressure had to have c-section) I am hoping that was due to owning a business and that I will be much healthier this time.

If anyone has any advice it will be much appreciated. we do have some family in Crete but also nice to get other people's opinions or advice.

Thanks Julie
XX

Ray
Posts: 346
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 4:26 pm
Location: Chania, Crete
Contact:

Postby Ray » Fri Sep 21, 2007 7:50 pm

You should probably read Caroline's book. It is very helpful in these areas.

http://www.livingincrete.net

All the best,

Ray

Kilkis
Posts: 10751
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Postby Kilkis » Fri Sep 21, 2007 11:43 pm

How do you make a choice? So far we have had relatively minor ailments and have used IKA. The treatment we have received has been excellent. We have lots of young Greek friends who have had babies. All had IKA insurance. All went private. None of them were wealthy and in some cases were hard pushed to find the fees. If you are in Chania, the gynecologist, Stelios Petroulakis, recommended on the main site seems to be very good. That is not speaking from personal experience, of course.

I agree with Ray. Isn't it funny how typing some words is very difficult. I keep practicing "I agree with John" but I haven't mastered it yet.

Warwick

Retired in Crete

Postby Retired in Crete » Sat Sep 22, 2007 12:17 am

Kilkis wrote:
I agree with Ray. Isn't it funny how typing some words is very difficult. I keep practicing "I agree with John" but I haven't mastered it yet.

Warwick


Keep practicing Warwick, come the day of the revolution, they will be your passport!

John

Carolina
Site Admin
Posts: 3136
Joined: Thu Jul 24, 2003 11:53 pm
Location: Chania, Crete
Contact:

Postby Carolina » Sat Sep 22, 2007 12:59 pm

Hi Julie,

If you have IKA insurance (from an E form) you can get free check ups, tests and scans at your local hospital, where the IKA gynecologists work from, and have the birth in hospital. You can usually see the same doctor throughout.

Many women here go to private clinics to give birth and pay. Cost for the whole treatment and tests throughout pregnancy, and the birth, is around 1,500 to 3,000 euros – caesarian being the most expensive.

Midwives do not deliver babies here. Only gynecologists can deliver and a midwife assists.

Some general comments - attitudes are different to childbirth and even the doctors and nurses are still stuck back in time on some issues -

- Greece has a high caesarian rate and “once a caesarian always a caesarian” is still pretty much the attitude of doctors, particularly if there is less than 2 to 3 years between births. Ask around the gynecologists for their policy. If going private you will have more choice of doctors and hopefully, say, in the birth, although it is suggested that one of the reasons for the high rate of c-sections in Greece is financial; private doctors charge more for a caesarian than a natural birth. You have a better chance of finding an English speaking gynecologist privately.


- All new born babies get given chamomile tea as soon as they are born and throughout the first few days of birth! Also at the slightest hint of a problem feeding, top up bottles of formula are encouraged. If you don’t agree with this you need to make your views very strongly known beforehand, and get your family to back you up and ensure that the nurses don’t feed baby – you’ll be too weak to do this yourself after the birth and don’t need the emotional upset.

In general the tests and overall care are good, just watch out for some different attitudes.

allan
Posts: 722
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 9:56 am
Location: Chania

Postby allan » Sat Sep 22, 2007 1:18 pm

- All new born babies get given chamomile tea as soon as they are born and throughout the first few days of birth- quote :shock: :shock:

I know that this herb is very good for you---- but to new borns?? :o :o

Is there any medical evidence that this is of help to a new baby?

Seems very strange to me that it is given automatically.

But as you say "watch out for some different attitudes."

Carolina
Site Admin
Posts: 3136
Joined: Thu Jul 24, 2003 11:53 pm
Location: Chania, Crete
Contact:

Postby Carolina » Sat Sep 22, 2007 1:36 pm

Allan - just ask your wife :wink:

A friend of mine gave birth just 2 months ago in a Chania clinic so I know that this is still the case. Nurses and docs took one heck of a lot of convincing that she would not allow her baby to be fed camomile tea - lots of tut tutting by the nurses and an awful lot of strength required by her.

They believe that it "shifts the mucous from the baby's lungs".
Another belief (you kind of asked for it Allan!) is that in the first few days when mother produces cholostrum the baby is not getting 'milk' and so needs top up of formula. Again this the very latest experience (as well as being mine in 1990) from a new mum.

JulieC
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2007 12:20 pm

Postby JulieC » Sat Sep 22, 2007 2:13 pm

Thank you all so much for your replies. I am going to get the book as soon as I get to Crete, Looking forward to reading it.

Everything you have put was sort of what I was thinking, am surprised at chamomile tea, but fine with that as I have read in books that it is really good for babies.

Thanks once again, you have put my mind at rest, will keep you posted!!

Julie

Kilkis
Posts: 10751
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Near Chania

Postby Kilkis » Sat Sep 22, 2007 2:48 pm

We recently sent a small present to an English friend in Kilkis, who has had a baby, and have just received a card back from her. Some of the things she is facing from the Greek family:

1 Going crazy that the baby is only in a nappy when the temperature is 40 C. It will catch its death of cold.
2 Spitting on the baby to ward off the evil eye.
3 Charms pinned onto the baby's bed linen also to ward off the evil eye.
4 Baby not allowed out of the house or anyone except the very closest relatives, i.e. grandmothers, to visit for the first 40 days.
5 Babies should sleep about 18 hours a day to aid growth.
6 Baby mustn't sit up for the first year or its legs will be deformed.

Obviously, you will not have a Greek family trying to impose these ideas on you but you will certainly experience them, or something similar, from Greek friends, neighbors and probably nurses and doctors.

You could tell your husband that the good news is he isn't expected to do anything at all. We showed one of our Greek friends a picture of sextuplets born in the UK who are now grown up and told her that when they were born the father had given up work to help bring them up. Her reply was, "Why? What use would he be?"

Warwick

allan
Posts: 722
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 9:56 am
Location: Chania

Postby allan » Sat Sep 22, 2007 5:19 pm

The "evil eye" is the best one>

When my wife has a headache she rings her mother (In Athens) and her Mother fills a glass with water and drops small quantities of oil into the water.

If the oil remains on the surface then my wife must have an evil eye looking at her.

If the oil disolves in the water my wifes headache will go away eventually.

Me I prefer tablets, quicker and no "Mumbo Jumbo " involved.

We do have disagreements about this by the way.

allan
Posts: 722
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 9:56 am
Location: Chania

Postby allan » Sat Sep 22, 2007 6:18 pm

Big C,

shall reply when I have all the information my wife has given me.....very different to the UK, very, very different.

They feed their 6 month old babies eggs!!!!

Retired in Crete

Postby Retired in Crete » Sat Sep 22, 2007 6:35 pm

Kilkis wrote:4 Baby not allowed out of the house or anyone except the very closest relatives, i.e. grandmothers, to visit for the first 40 days.


A pregnant friend of ours told us that there is a law which says that women must not leave the house for 40 days after giving birth. She said it is designed to stop them being forced to work in the fields too soon.

John

allan
Posts: 722
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 9:56 am
Location: Chania

Postby allan » Sat Sep 22, 2007 9:57 pm

I also have heard of this "Old wives tale"

And to back it up some members of the church also said that if they were to leave the house then the Devil would come to their house and cause untold harm to the newborn.

:o :o :o :o

Selena
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 6:43 am
Location: Stalis, Crete

Postby Selena » Sun Sep 23, 2007 7:12 am

This is my experience... sorry lots of info if you're not pregnant!

I had my twins on December 16th 2006 in Agios Nikolaos hospital. I was pretty worried after hearing all the scare stories. I have TAXE insurance but for only one year (for many benefits you need it for 2 years, not quite sure on all of that as my partner handles that side).

We were recommended a doctor (Dr Katassos?) and decided to use the public services, mainly due to financial reasons. I didn't have enough stamps for the health service at the beginning of the pregnancy but it only cost 3 euros for each check-up. Sometimes we had to wait hours though, with many heavily-pregnant women sitting in a crowded corridor. Each visit they checked my weight and asked me general questions and every month they had a look at the babies with an external scan. (This happens for single pregnancies too not just twins). We usually had to remind the room next door to check my blood pressure. At the initial meeting I had a load of blood tests (they didnt charge me as they knew I was waiting for health book but I think costs around 200 euros the lot??), and when they saw I was anaemic was given iron tablets. At 5 months they will tell you the gender if you want to know, and actually if you look carefully on the photos you get each month it also tells you there.

I was expecting a Caesarean 80% anyway because of the twins. At my 7 month check, the doc said he could feel my uterus contracting so they sent me to be tested on the machine for that. I had to be admitted in the end and put on a drip with medication as my doc believed the twins were on their way too early. I ended up in there for one month... Actually it was not too bad. I've never been in hospital in the UK so can't compare, but the food was adequate. Morning: milk/tea/coffee & toast & jam. Lunch: apple, soup, salad, 'greek' type food eg horta, lemony pasta, chicken etc, similar for dinner. You need to back it up with what you like though, and its very boring so definitely need visiters. I was in a ward with 3 beds, and I found it a little disturbing that women having abortions shared rooms with pregnant women and those who had just given birth? I saw a lot of women come in and out. Usually you are in for 4 days for a natural birth and 5 for a Caesarean. One person can stay over night with you but they can only sleep in a chair (or as one mother did, slept on the bed while her pregnant daughter wandered the corridors!). There is a cafe just down the corridor.

The nurses were great, a mixed bunch but you got to know them, about 50% spoke English (btw my doc spoke perfect English as did most of the people higher than nurse level). I do understand most Greek so that really helped as not many of my fellow patients were fluent. I found it was a mix of Greeks, Eastern Europeans and Russians, but many Greeks had actually come from Athens because they knew my doc Katassos.

After one boring month of going for the contraction test every day the doc decided at exactly 8 months that he would get them out. At around 10 pm he came down from a surgery, looked at my results and said to call my mum and partner. 30 minutes later I was prepped (they shave you, change to a gown and sort your IV.)MY partner and mum got here just in time to go up. Nobody is allowed in with you. My anaesthetist was fantastic, really reassuring, had an epidural no probs, he held my hand through everything and explained it all and came to see me and the boys later. Op took around 30 minutes. Everything very clean and professional.

Recovery was hard. You have to have someone with you all the time, the nurses do not do things like take you to the bathroom. Your visitors will be expected to help lift you, to help wash you etc, and sometimes not that much privacy at all. Also one of my boys was a little small and was sent to Heraklion for 10 days to watch his weight as Ag Nik did not have facilities. The first night both stayed in incubators in the next room then Matthew stayed by my bed and Alexander went to Heraklion in morning.

One head nurse spent ages trying to help me breastfeed but as they were early and op and one sent away I never had enough milk to do it, although I felt they much preferred me to breastfeed. I too was told to give them camomile tea, and as my mum is aromatherapist had no problem. Didnt do them any harm anyway. Had to provide nappies, milk-they gave things like cotton wool and companies came round giving loads of free samples and you sign up to get things every month.

Discharged, had to go back to get stitches checked as got infected (lifted kids too much).

Overall I was very happy. From what I hear got pretty similar service as private but saved a few thousand euros...

Any questions at all I can help... please e-mail me selenamartine@hotmail.com

Carolina
Site Admin
Posts: 3136
Joined: Thu Jul 24, 2003 11:53 pm
Location: Chania, Crete
Contact:

Postby Carolina » Sun Sep 23, 2007 8:38 am

Retired in Crete wrote:
A pregnant friend of ours told us that there is a law which says that women must not leave the house for 40 days after giving birth. She said it is designed to stop them being forced to work in the fields too soon.

John


Possibly there is an old law which still exists, however I believe the 40 Days originated with the Greek Orthodox church. They believe that both Mother and Baby are 'unclean' after the birth, therefore should not set foot in other people's houses although it's OK for people to visit them at home. After 40 days they are allowed to be blessed in church and hence 'cleaned'.

They still adhere to this belief and it is very much frowned upon for a baby to be taken out of the house until he / she 'exei sarandisi' (been blessed at 40 days old).


Return to “General Discussion & News”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests