On Our Doorstep...

For discussion, news, comments, questions and information about Crete & Greece.
Clio
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On Our Doorstep...

Postby Clio » Sun Apr 07, 2013 7:58 pm


Jeffstclair
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Postby Jeffstclair » Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:28 pm

Sounds like a great Idea, however many of the abandoned houses in this area are roof less with no water etc, a lot of cash will be needed to make them in to homes ...jeff...

Carolina
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Postby Carolina » Sun Apr 07, 2013 10:08 pm

Two or four walls and a makeshift roof is an improvement for any homeless person to sleeping on the streets.

When I was travelling around Greece nearly 30 years ago I spent a couple of nights sleeping in a sleeping bag on building sites when we were stuck in the middle of nowhere once or twice - they afforded at least some protection against the elements, preferable to sleeping out in the open.

Brian c
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Postby Brian c » Mon Apr 08, 2013 12:12 am

I know I will sound terribly niave here ..but why are there homeless people living there?? and if you were to temporarly loan them your house, how likely are you to get it back in good condition with no fuss?
dont sweat the small things

Kilkis
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Postby Kilkis » Mon Apr 08, 2013 12:19 am

Brian c wrote:I know I will sound terribly niave here ..but why are there homeless people living there??...


Probably because 25 % of the population is unemployed and has been for over a year. As Carol noted on another thread, there are no catch-all benefits in Greece of any kind. Once you have been out of work for a year you are on your own. Your income is zero, nothing nada. No money - no rent - no home.

Warwick

Brian c
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Postby Brian c » Mon Apr 08, 2013 12:30 am

I take that comment back Kilkis, just googled "homeless in Crete" and was surprised at the amount of info. when you are fortunate enough not to fall into that catagory it is ???? difficult to imagine how a goverment can allow its people to be that desperate and actually homeless. illegal imigrants who are not registered I can understand living rough, but voters.
dont sweat the small things

filippos
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Postby filippos » Mon Apr 08, 2013 8:17 am

And just the sort of situation to give organisations like Golden Dawn more opportunity to gain support by promising to fix everything. When you have nothing, are cold and starving it must be very tempting for some to swallow the propaganda and empty promises.

Even if GD became big enough to lead the Government, Heaven forbid, what are they going to be able to do? Propagate yet more strife and hatred? As far as I can see they can do bugger all that will help anyone (except, maybe, their own leaders).

Kilkis
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Postby Kilkis » Mon Apr 08, 2013 11:36 am

filippos wrote:And just the sort of situation to give organisations like Golden Dawn more opportunity to gain support by promising to fix everything...


I went to a meeting near Athens a couple of weeks ago. One of the people I was talking to was the youngish (around 30?) brother-in-law of my ex-boss. He said that virtually all his friends were now supporters of GD. These are all young, well educated, middle class people. Quite disturbing I found.

Warwick

Retired in Crete

Postby Retired in Crete » Mon Apr 08, 2013 1:04 pm

The number of homeless is very obvious when you drive in Athens. There is hardly a flyover or bridge that people are not living under.

John

Carolina
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Postby Carolina » Mon Apr 08, 2013 4:02 pm

Nearer home - the soup kitchen in Splanzia, Hania feeds around 180 people
daily, including many homeless, and there are many other soup kitchens in the area and across the island:

http://www.organicallycooked.com/2011/0 ... hania.html

moved 2 crete
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Postby moved 2 crete » Tue Apr 09, 2013 10:36 am

Facts like this are very worrying, is it the city dwellers who suffer the most, or is it across the board. :shock:
Dave H

Kilkis
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Postby Kilkis » Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:26 am

moved 2 crete wrote:Facts like this are very worrying, is it the city dwellers who suffer the most, or is it across the board. :shock:


The austerity applies to everybody but the people who live in the country usually have some land where they can grow food for themselves, keep a few chickens, possibly a goat. People in the city don't have this option.

An English friend in the next village, who has been a keen gardener all his life, used to grow enough vegetables to fed himself and his wife the whole year round. This is on a plot of about 1,000 sqm. The plot had 30 plus orange trees of different varieties plus a few olive trees and he had planted apples, pears, peaches, apricots and avocado. The olive trees yielded enough oil that he never needed to buy any plus some olives bottled for eating. By giving excess produce to neighbours he would often get given eggs and other produce that he didn't grow himself. When he wasn't gardening he spent a lot of time walking so knew where to find lots of wild fruits and nuts and the locals taught him how to recognise and harvest the various types of horta. His wife was a keen cook and spent most of her time baking and making preserves of various sorts from the excess produce. It cuts down the expenditure quite a lot.

There have been many articles in the media describing how the post Junta migration from the land to the cities is now being reversed with lots of young people going back to live in the villages. This mostly applies to young people who have elderly relatives who stayed in the villages and have land there. The young people provide the labour to make the land more productive and they gain by having somewhere to live and something to eat. It probably isn't what they aspired to but it is better than scavenging from bins. Obviously, not everybody has this option.

Warwick

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Postby Topdriller » Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:54 pm

The "islanders" also have tourism to bolster their income during the long summer months. Athens obviously does have 'visitors' but you have to think the media coverage over the last few years has put off a lot of people i.e. riots in Athens, fire bombs and the like.

This winter has been tougher for the locals here on Crete because of the additional taxes e.g. the second year of the property tax but on the whole they seem to be coping with austerity far better than the city dwellers on the mainland. And as Warwick points out, a lot of this has to do with older family members having houses and land which will always produce food no matter what the government thinks up next.

I'm fairly certain we will again see "older" cars here on Crete as people keep their cars longer, downsize to small models etc. We will also see the further rise of small shops that again repair broken washing machines, dishwashers, TVs, tools etc. as people try to repair their consumer goods, rather than just throw them out and buy a new one.

And truth be told, this is a good thing because it gives work to the enterprising locals.

Austerity is a horrible thing but it also offers opportunities. A small phone shop has opened up in Chania which is run by a young guy who will now repair your mobile phone, unlock it etc. at a small cost. If more young Greeks could follow this example they would find a ready market because people will soon not be able to afford expensive German imports.

This will become even more true if, as suspected, they do eventually return to the Drachma.

Jon.
We need men who dream of things that never were.

Carolina
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Postby Carolina » Tue Apr 09, 2013 2:18 pm

I read somewhere last year that one of the fastest growing new small businesses in Greece are cycle shops as many people are turning to pedal power!

I agree that it's a good thing that people now look to repair goods rather than replace. My feeling is that there has been a rather cavalier attitude towards money since the euro was introduced and, particularly amongst the upwardly mobile younger generations, it was seen as ντροπη (shameful) to question prices or shop around. Those attitudes have had to change and I think they are now much more aware of the value of their money.

johnincrete
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Postby johnincrete » Tue Apr 09, 2013 5:15 pm

Some weeks ago, I sat with the owner of a bar in the harbour and we watched the expensive Mercs, Audis etc being driven by young people. On leaving, I passed the packed tavernas and bars - packed with young people.
There are many people in Chania with plenty of money. I wonder if they ever consider giving support to the soup kitchens. Maybe some do.

Jesus said that we would always have poor people. It's true. Capitalists would say that we can support the poor by the wealth they generate who are then encouraged to seek their own wealth - but not many do. Socialists just steal money from the rich to give to the poor who become dependent on handouts. Perhaps there is some deep reason that poor people are poor and which prevents them lifting themselves up that Jesus knew about.

That said, I still think we should seek to help those who are willing to work but cannot find jobs and those who cannot work through disability etc. I understand some shops have collection points for food although I have never seen one but it would seem a good idea so that those of us who would not miss a few euros could help.


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