Speed cameras

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filippos
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Postby filippos » Sat Aug 02, 2014 7:17 pm

scooby wrote:Men in suits will always make you pay.
I just knew there had to be a reason to buy a suit.

ScotinCrete
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Postby ScotinCrete » Sun Aug 03, 2014 5:56 pm

the move to front facing camera's in the UK meant that bikes - with no front plate - had 'an advantage'. Though if anyone regularly abused that advantage it was not uncommon to find a mobile camera operator appear to discuss exactly what the hand signals in the photographs were meant to convey to the police force involved :D

john4d
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Postby john4d » Mon Aug 04, 2014 2:28 pm

Warwick

In the UK there are many instances with one camera but road markings on both sides of the road. Yesterday I saw a camera mounted on a 'bollard island' again with road markings on both sides of the road. This of course does not answer the question as one set of markings could be a 'con' put there to slow people down. There is only one way to find out for sure, but I'm not going to put it too the test :D

John
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Kilkis
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Postby Kilkis » Mon Aug 04, 2014 5:05 pm

There must be millions of places in the UK where there are road markings and no camera at all, John. 90 % of the road markings around the M25 for example. Cameras get moved. Quote from www.speedcamerasuk.com/gatso.htm

"The Gatso meter speed camera is a rear facing camera and as such can only succesfully obtain a vehicles speed when driving past the Gatso. In other words if a Gatso speed camera is on the opposite side of the road and is pointing towards you it cannot record or catch you speeding. However be sure you're driving towards a Gatso and not the forward facing Truvelo camera as these are designed to work as a motorist drives towards them! It's also worth noting that Gatso's which are installation on a central reservation of traffic island can be turned periodically to target motorists traveling in either direction."

Warwick
Last edited by Kilkis on Tue Aug 05, 2014 9:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

john4d
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Postby john4d » Mon Aug 04, 2014 8:19 pm

But the two sets of lines were adjacent, the camera looking at both of them, so at least one set is a con. The question remains is it a rear facing Gatso or a forward facing Truvelo? The camera housing is not 'aimed'at either set of markings. I'm still not going to put it to the test :D
There's no such thing as a bad taste joke

bobscott
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Postby bobscott » Tue Aug 05, 2014 9:09 am

Agree with much of what has been said - especially about the closeness of the speed restriction signs to the (often partially obscured) camera. However, not all cameras are aimed at a changed speed - for instance the one on the right going from the Kalyves entry point to the Kalami point, doesn't appear to have any speed restriction - so presumably it's trying to catch those who are doing more than 80kph (if that is what the limit is there - who knows?). However, the instinct is to slow right down to 60kph in anticipation of a change in speed limit. Very confusing.
Yesterday today was tomorrow. Don't dilly dally!

mouche
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Postby mouche » Tue Aug 05, 2014 10:58 am

A possible solution to this huge problem could be to slow down and obey the law - speed limits?

Jeffstclair
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Postby Jeffstclair » Tue Aug 05, 2014 11:07 am

With you on that mouche,...jeff...

Mixos
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Postby Mixos » Tue Aug 05, 2014 11:29 am

But with all due respect to mouche and Jeff ... "the law" is an ass when it's not made clear ... and that seems to be the main point of this thread.

Kilkis
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Postby Kilkis » Tue Aug 05, 2014 12:12 pm

For example, it is classed as a National Highway. To the best of my knowledge a single carriageway National Highway has a speed limit of 90 kph. Where it is a dual carriageway enclosed on both sides, e.g. like the section from the Omalos junction to the Souda junction, the speed limit on a National Highway is increased to 110 kph. Should I presume that if I drive at these speeds I won't get booked? Try it and see.

The road along the north of Crete is clearly not really a National Highway despite being described as such. I think the speed limit is 80 kph, or less where indicated, for its whole length. There are the odd 80 kph signs but no way of knowing if they are general or just for a marked section. How is anybody supposed to know what the limit is, especially tourists. Add in missing, damaged and obscured signs where the speed limit is reduced and you have total chaos. Exactly as it should be of course.

Warwick

mouche
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Postby mouche » Tue Aug 05, 2014 3:51 pm

Mixos wrote:But with all due respect to mouche and Jeff ... "the law" is an ass when it's not made clear ... and that seems to be the main point of this thread.


Do you find it difficult to read the signs stating the speed-limit? Although we don't live in Crete we have done about 10.000 kilometers of driving there over the last couple of years and gone all around the island, but have not really found this to be a problem. Admittedly have just recently got new glasses.

Kilkis
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Postby Kilkis » Tue Aug 05, 2014 4:48 pm

You cannot totally rely on speed signs, Mouche, although obviously they should be obeyed if they exist. You see a speed limit for 60 kph. Is it 60 kph for the next 1,000 km? All roads in most countries have a blanket speed limit, i.e. the limit that applies if there is no sign. The start and end signs for a reduced limit for that particular road are there because there is some hazard, e.g. a junction, a built up area etc.

Suppose you see a 50 kph sign and within a short distance you enter a village. It is reasonable to assume the reduced limit is because of the village. a couple of km later you exit the village and pass the end of village sign but there is no end of 50 kph sign. A pretty common occurrence in my experience. It is now an open road with no hazards of any sort. Do you carry on driving at 50 kph? How long for? The next hour, two hours etc?

The speed cameras in Crete are generally on ΒΟΑΚ. BOAK is defined as a National Highway. It is reasonable to assume, therefore, that the blanket speed limits on ΒΟΑΚ are those for a National Highway as described in the Greek Highway Code. They aren't. They are lower. How is somebody who does not live in Crete supposed to know that? Some sort of information osmosis? That is the main complaint.

The secondary complaint is that many of the signs that do exist are completely illegible including many near camera sites. So yes, people do find it difficult to read some signs including some important ones.

Warwick

Jean
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Postby Jean » Tue Aug 05, 2014 5:41 pm

Do you find it difficult to read the signs stating the speed-limit? Although we don't live in Crete we have done about 10.000 kilometers of driving there over the last couple of years and gone all around the island, but have not really found this to be a problem.

Mouche, can you name me where I can see ONE sign between Heraklion and Kissamos where the maximum allowed speed on the National Road is shown?
Last edited by Jean on Tue Aug 05, 2014 7:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Mixos
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Postby Mixos » Tue Aug 05, 2014 5:52 pm

Warwick makes my point far more lucidly than I can, mouche. Yes, I can read speed limit signs -- where they exist and are actually readable -- but if you have to guess what the limit is at any given point on the road, because the signs aren't there or badly sequenced, then it can be quire difficult to obey the law. :shock:

mouche
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Postby mouche » Tue Aug 05, 2014 8:40 pm

1. Speed limits in Crete are as follows: 50 km per hour (30 mph) in built-up areas and 90 kph (56 mph) on the highway.

2. The Crete driving speed limit is indicated by road signs, but be careful when driving in Crete because signs are often obscured by vegetation - and not seeing them is no defence.

50km/h (30mph) is the maximum in cities and built up areas
80km/h (50mph) outside cities, and
90km/h (60mph) on the National Road (although 100km/h and less than 90km/h on certain sections)

Took me less than three minutes to find these. Google speed limits in Crete and see for yourselves.


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